Getting Out of Though Situations

Photo by Oliver Paaske

Thinking that we are stuck is one of the greatest illusions in life. With every step we take or decision to remain passive, time keeps on moving forward. We can choose if we move or stand still, but standing still will doesn’t change anything and it certainly won’t stop the time. Feeling stuck comes from a place of fear. It takes courage to change our circumstances, to stop blaming anyone or anything for what is happening to us and to take full responsibility instead.

Empowering language shifts the focus from the issue to an actionable solution. And if we are able to look forward, we then can take one more step to get ourselves out of any situation. What’s the next step to get you closer to where we want to be in life?

‘We Are Unfinished Human BEings’

Photo by Sheldon Liu

In her bestseller book called ‘Mindset’, Dr Carol S. Dweck is committed to teaching the growth mindset. Naming humans ‘unfinished human beings’ really made me aware of what a fix mindset is about: thinking that with a degree, a place in the society, a family and a good job we are ‘settled’. We no longer need to work for things, we’ve reached our final state. Wrong.

A fix mindset keeps us prisoners to the past when the world around us is ever evolving.

It’s always striking to hear people speaking about not their wish of not having to work when the alternative brings depression and lack of self-belief. Living life with eagerness – eager to make mistakes, to learn, to move forward – is what allows us to stand out and bring value to the world.

Help Your Body Overcome Tiredness

Photo by Cris Saur

Feeling sleepy and lacking energy can be reflective of our mental and emotional wellbeing, our diet or of how active we are.

Apathy is a sign that we need a change in our life and if we don’t know what or how to change our circumstances, it’s a sign that we need to ask for help. Our diet can slow us down or increase our chances of success.

The irony comes with being active. The more we engage in physical activities, the more effort we can put in. By increasing our endurance we give ourselves a chance to feeling healthier. Exercise and depression don’t see eye to eye and although it’s not always easy going for a walk or doing an exercise routine, it definitely help us overcome tiredness.

By working out we get more restful sleep. That perfect holiday you envision where you don’t get to leave the bed for a whole week is not design to make anyone happy but the hotel owner.

Own up to your choices, put in gradual, constant effort and rip off gradual, constant benefits.

Smartphone Dependency & Our Wellbeing Don’t Go Well Together

Even before having a Twitter account I engaged in debates over the effects that social media has on our behavior. Topics such as social isolation, bullying and harassment on one side and engagement, interaction, self-growth, networking on the other side were thrown around the table.

Did I ever wonder at that point about the role that technology plays and not just about the role of social media? Not at all.

A recent study led by researcher Matthew Lapierre from the University of Arizona looked at smartphone dependency and its connection to depression. The study revealed that it becomes problematic when people are using smartphones to replace or escape living their non-virtual existence.

Extreme reliance on our device, anxiety if we get separated from it for even a moment or two, are signs of later depression and loneliness. What can we do?

Exercise:

Live without your smartphone for 12 hours (sleeping doesn’t count).

  1. Let your loved ones know that you will be out of reach for 12 hours.
  2. Turn off the device or put it away, on silent.
  3. Live. Walk. Breath. Carry on with your day.
  4. Keep a journal of the experience.
  5. At the end of the 12 hours after feasting in the use of technology, read what you’ve wrote.
  6. How does that make you feel?

“If depression and loneliness lead to smartphone dependency, we could reduce dependency by adjusting people’s mental health, but if smartphone dependency (precedes depression and loneliness), which is what we found, we can reduce smartphone dependency to maintain or improve wellbeing.”

Communication Master’s Student Pengfei Zhao, Study Co-Authored

Resources:

Which comes first: Smartphone dependency or depression? by Matthew Lapierre. Pengfei Zhao and Benjamin Custer