How Decisions Dictate Our Actions

Photo by Miguel Bruna

If we decide to be successful or come up with a plan and don’t implement it, we can be tricked into thinking that decisions and actions have little to do with each other. However, making the decision of planning and the decision of implementing the plan are two different things. They are both actions, which is a positive, but plans are probably only useful in jobs where we are in for the hours and the ‘free time’ weekend reward – meaning, we couldn’t care less.

Not caring is not something that we can switch on and off as we please. Not at first. If we are in the mindset of making tasks appear like that they’ve been dealt with, postponing deadlines and dragging our feet around, that’s a setback that requires a huge shift. If you are an entrepreneur ‘after hours’ and are still in a job to support you while you are taking your business of the ground, you’d be impressed to hear that you have the ability to deliver high quality of work throughout the entire day.

You have the power to change into a person that gets things done without being conditioned by the threat of a deadline or rewards. That’s an attitude that we need to take into each area of our life – finances, relationships, health. Decide to care at every single level and you will experience impressive growth. You will master the power of decision.

The ‘Letting the Bus Go’ Exercise

Photo by Lawless Capture

Accepting how much we can achieve under time pressure without allowing panic to take over can be challenging. How often do we run into situations over which we don’t have much control, such as catching a bus ‘on time’ when it’s early? How do you react? Do you calmly head towards the bus stop or do your feet start running without processing what’s going on?

In my case, it has always been the second option. There might be a slight connection with my experience as a child, when I would see the bus from the top of the hill on a parallel road and I had to outrun it to the bus stop so I could make it to school on time.

Today I was advised to do the ‘letting the bus go’ exercise. It simply involved watching buses go into the direction I was headed, without catching them. My heart raced every time a bus reached their stop. I was ready to sprint, wave and position myself in front of the bus if need be just to get in. That was my fight instinct, a beautiful genetic heritage which in the world of having a bus scheduled every 10 minutes it only gives me stomach ache.

What is your ‘letting the bus go’ exercise that you need in order to improve your life?