Be a Leader Who Sees People for Their Qualities

Photo by KOBU Agency

Competition is what pushes many of us to meet our full potential, but it also makes us critical of other people’s flaws and qualities.

Treating people for less than what they are or can be is painful. It perpetuates a culture of aggressive dominance of our leaders over the ones who are still growing. We see it in business, on TV, at work, in schools – but we shy from calling it out.

When mistakes are made and we get judged rather than educated is when collective failure manifests itself. We fail not for being better, but for thinking that someone else’s mistake makes us better.

What type of leader do you want to be?

What It Takes to Be Wrong, to Fail, to Be Misunderstood

Differences and similarities with other people are not accurate forms of self-characterization. We seek allies and perhaps people to call enemies in attempts to understand ourselves. We reduce our world to the people that intersect it and allow them to reflect on us. We shrink into being.

*Be careful* *You might fall* *You might fail* *I told you so* *You’re wrong*

There are vast examples of how not to be wrong, not to fail or be misunderstood. They’re all values of the temple of fear that we worship. What does it take to be wrong, to fail or be misunderstood? Trying in the first place. But guess what? This is exactly what it takes to be right, succeed and be supported and it’s highly unlikely that the second will happen without the first.

As far as the awareness of our five senses informs us, we are beings of this life. We get this one chance to be who we want to be. Start building yourself up and don’t look around you for advise. Look ahead of you. People who made progress understand that skill sharing and shared life lessons are brings value to everyone to involved. Don’t worry about being wrong or failing or being misunderstood. Worry about being quiet, passive, ignorant. Progress happens in motion so start moving.

Being Lenient or Being Weak?

For far too long I’ve associated leadership with masculinity. A deep voice, a gaze that stops people from talking before opening their mouth and a laid back character. I might be able to achieve the three attributes, but it is unlikely that I’ll achieve them all at the same time.

Which makes me wonder: can I be me and still lead? There are a few things I can do to feel empowered, and they all rely on understanding power.

  1. Personal power is something that people can take away from you if you let them.
  2. Senses-based power is circumstantial and at times, outside of our control, hence not really a power.
  3. Personal power sits in kindness, in the good, the better selves. That power is ours and ours only.

We spend too much of our time safekeeping materialist fortunes and we allow them to define us. We are superior creatures. Our strength is in seeing ahead of ourselves and outside of ourselves. But for that we have to dig deep within. We can then see power in forgiveness. Forgiveness is a gift we give to ourselves. The gift of the present.

A deep voice, a strong gaze, a laid back character. They’re all a made-up qualities-concoction. They’re things we perceive as power generators. Personal power comes from within and it lends itself to anyone humble enough to create it.