Self-CONFIDENCE and Being Active

Photo by Casey Horner

Are confident people busier than other people or is it the other way around?

Engaging in a high number of activities, social interaction and splitting our interest over different subjects brings together confidence in undertaking new challenges and overall self-belief.

Our brain no longer knows instinctively what’s best for us. The illusion of relaxing through passive behavior can take its toll on our body and on our mind. Passive behavior impacts our overall performance and ability to persist and succeed.

Have you ever noticed how much more energy you draw out of being active? Don’t postpone on that language class or knitting workshop. As long as you enjoy it, it is relaxing and it nurtures your self-confidence at the same time.

Fact: Imposed Deadlines Do Work

Photo by Nik Shuliahin 

We don’t give nearly enough credit to our brains as we should do. Progress is caused by necessity and needing something is not a stroll in the park – it is often urgent! So why do we trick ourselves into thinking that having time = success?

Deadlines have a bad reputation mainly because of the emotions associated with them. If we wipe out our feelings we might surprise ourselves into being incredibly productive and reaching peak levels of performance. The Pomodoro technique is based on the principle that you will take as long of a time to complete a task as you give yourself and the quality of the end result is not dictated by the time invested in the task.

What’s next?

Give yourself the chance to work intentional. Structure your tasks into smaller bits and allocate chunks of time with small breaks in-between to complete the project.

Let’s say you need to write an essay or a dissertation. Give yourself two chunks of 25 minutes for the introduction. Even if it’s a voluminous piece of work write as much as you can in the given time. You’ve got more ideas and not enough time to cover them? Write them down with bullet points. To complete a project you need to complete the small structures of it. It takes fewer Pomodoros than days to complete tasks which you perceive as mountains.