Day 1: Making the Most Out of the Time We’ve Got

Have you ever noticed how time seems to vanish? The time between Mondays and Fridays, or just between the beginning of summer and the end of it. Although it might feel like there is nothing in between, there is. If anything, your bills are a constant reminder that something did happen. I would call though those anchor moments, moments of awareness. When something so powerful is happening to you that it shakes you off a loop of habitual living, of mindlessly just getting by. Those moments of awareness are your time to make decisions.

The best decision one can make is to create more moments of being here, now, 100%. You don’t have to make radical changes in your life unless you want to, but living life responsibly means more than just staying in your own corner and hoping not to do anything out of sync with the rest of the world. It means that you have responsibility towards yourself, the people in your life, all beings on Earth, our very own planet, the Universe, everyone is keeping you accountable to MAKE EVERY MOMENT MATTER. Because, guess what? It does.

DEdicate Every Minute of Your Day to Build Up Your Dream

Photo by Vincentiu Solomon

It might sound radical, but when was greatness achieved as a result of sluggish work ethic combined with wishes rather than must’s? If you’re worried that once you’ve reached a goal you’ll have nothing to look forward to, stop. Stop treating reality as an experience that ends without you. You can stay connected, create and be aware for as long as you have consciousness. Allow yourself to live in the present and make every minute worth wile.

The One Thing We Can’t Claim Back – Time

Photo by Matthew Huang

Time off in lieu is a concept that can trick us into thinking that when we invest our time into something, we can then back time. This might be doable as part of the workweek convention, but let us not be fooled that time can be claimed back. Time is the only universal currency that we trade at any given time and it’s the one area in which we are all equal.

We created a category of time unaccounted for called leisure time or free time. ‘Free’ time is as valuable as we make it. If we use it to up the quality of our lives by bringing value and growing, every minute of our life can add to a positive balance. When we give our time to consuming the hyperrealities portrayed by Netflix, television, social media, celebrity personas and so on, we trade our time and even then, it’s not free. We pay money to spend time and the effect that these activities have on us and our evolution is negative. Good night sleep versus going out drinking? One good deal over a bad deal.

All time is accounted for in the grand scheme of things, even though we might not always keep track of it. So whenever we look at people making more money than us or pursuing their dreams, we must remember that they are simply making a better time trade. They choose to create, rather than consume. And once you add value, you not only get rewarded financially, but the impact on your on growth will be positive.

How to Use Tension in a Productive Way

Photo by Monica Leonardi

We tend to want to eliminate completely built-up stress, either through activities that clear our mind, such as meditation or exercise, or through activities that give us pleasure at the expense of our long-term wellbeing – drinking, stress eating etc. Focusing on tension release without accounting for the long-term impact of how we do it creates a bigger negative impact in the long run than the immediate positive effect.

Experiencing tension is a good opportunity to pause and understanding what led us to this moment. Is it frustration with our own decisions or some things that are outside of our control. Once we understand the root cause, we can empower ourselves to change the way we react to situations. Reactions are natural, but they are also specific to each individual. We react based on what we perceive as normal. A broader example is how some cultures celebrate death, while others celebrate the birth of a child. Our values are specific to us.

Tension is our body and brain reacting to events throughout the day and storing a sense of alertness that cannot be maintained for a long period of time. Managing tension is a life skill that allows us to clear out the clouds and see the sky clearly. Under a clear sky we are more likely to stick to our path than in semi-darkness. Also, seeing more friends than threats in people will attract more kindness.

What’s Your Goal for the Weekend?

Photo by Ethan Hoover

Ready to breath the relief of the weekend? It took me a while to realize that I get as much of the weekend as I am awake and productive. If we think of the weekend as a recharge and energize experience for the week ahead, we are limiting our growth. Working Monday to Friday in a sometimes repetitive role handicaps us, shatters our dreams and reinforces limitations. But applying discipline over the weekend to achieve whatever it is we set our mind to might actually make us feel more lively and in charge of our own lives than any amounts of sleep and lazing around.

What we need is what we tell ourselves that we need. If we think we need comfort food when things are not working out or 48 hours to ‘recharge’ by doing nothing, we will waste years of hour lives. Living is personal to each one of us, unless we adhere to codes that inhibit our growth and make us settle for less. These social constructs make us act the same way as the majority and unless there is a bored to death and wait for things to happen competition, chances are we are nowhere near succeeding at building a life of our own. Make your choice of how you want to live your life.

Are All Opportunities Worth Pursuing?

Photo by Markus Spiske

The rational answer is ‘no’, but our natural instinct often says otherwise. We put a lot of pressure on ourselves in making sure that we don’t miss out on opportunities. If you’re at the early stages in creating a business, the culture of many entrepreneurs can be hard work rather than smart work.

Think about how much more effective would be to work those extensive hours on smart work. Every human interaction is an opportunity to learn, but the lesson might at times be that you’d like to do things differently. Learn from other people’s burnout before experiencing it yourself and understand that long hours at a low productivity rate are counterproductive.

The more opportunities we pursue, the more we increase our chance of success. If we can’t put in much effort into any of these chances, we are at risk of covering too much ground with too little attention to detail. Knowing our limitations means that we can turn our assets into great advantages.