Stressed and Confused? Only You Can Change That

Photo by Zahari Dimitrov

Does the influx of unwanted information start to take over your life? Are you trapped between worry, stress and uncertainty? Stop. Take a deep breath. Clear your thoughts. We are all faced with a choice.

As comfortable as the victim mindset makes us feel, it’s detrimental to our wellbeing. So then what can we do? If we’d see the wave coming we most likely won’t run towards it. Similarly, facing the avalanche of bad news and misinformation, what makes us think that being swamped by negativity will have the opposite effect: positivity, regeneration and growth?

To regain calm we need to anchor ourselves into a reality that we can work towards. We can envision health and prosperity and even if these ideas are being challenged at the moment, what projecting misery achieves is only making room for misery.

We may not be able to change the world around us, but we can change the world we build and we project. Let’s make the world shine with the beauty of our thoughts and the strength of our emotions.

the Gift of Importance

Photo by Shirly Niv Marton 

We all want to feel valued. Making others feel important is more likely to bring us friends than building ourselves up by belittling people. Since we all have something to offer, there is great value focusing on what a person does well rather than the points that are not aligned with our own stance.

Respect is earned, but is it? If respect is earned, wouldn’t it mean that we always have to prove ourselves to other people? And in that search, aren’t we moving further and further away from our true nature?

Balancing truthfulness with appreciation is not easy, but reprogramming the mind can happen through practice. Our thinking patterns are thoughts that became habits. Habits can change. We can change as a result of that. And we can start by acknowledging that we don’t need validation, but if other people do, that’s fine – we have plenty to offer.

Self-CONFIDENCE and Being Active

Photo by Casey Horner

Are confident people busier than other people or is it the other way around?

Engaging in a high number of activities, social interaction and splitting our interest over different subjects brings together confidence in undertaking new challenges and overall self-belief.

Our brain no longer knows instinctively what’s best for us. The illusion of relaxing through passive behavior can take its toll on our body and on our mind. Passive behavior impacts our overall performance and ability to persist and succeed.

Have you ever noticed how much more energy you draw out of being active? Don’t postpone on that language class or knitting workshop. As long as you enjoy it, it is relaxing and it nurtures your self-confidence at the same time.

Fact: Imposed Deadlines Do Work

Photo by Nik Shuliahin 

We don’t give nearly enough credit to our brains as we should do. Progress is caused by necessity and needing something is not a stroll in the park – it is often urgent! So why do we trick ourselves into thinking that having time = success?

Deadlines have a bad reputation mainly because of the emotions associated with them. If we wipe out our feelings we might surprise ourselves into being incredibly productive and reaching peak levels of performance. The Pomodoro technique is based on the principle that you will take as long of a time to complete a task as you give yourself and the quality of the end result is not dictated by the time invested in the task.

What’s next?

Give yourself the chance to work intentional. Structure your tasks into smaller bits and allocate chunks of time with small breaks in-between to complete the project.

Let’s say you need to write an essay or a dissertation. Give yourself two chunks of 25 minutes for the introduction. Even if it’s a voluminous piece of work write as much as you can in the given time. You’ve got more ideas and not enough time to cover them? Write them down with bullet points. To complete a project you need to complete the small structures of it. It takes fewer Pomodoros than days to complete tasks which you perceive as mountains.

Habit Stacking: the Magical Shortcut to Healthy Habits

Habit stacking is a technique that works great as long as we have a primary habit that’s strong enough to stack other habits on. For instance, if we tend to have dinner at the same time, we can stack on it the habit of taking a walk. After we’ve built a strong connection between the two habits, we can stack some more –> shower –> read ->> go to sleep

This means that even if we don’t have dinner on the dot every day, we can still comply by shortening the consequent activities. If we decide to do intermittent fasting and skip dinner, going for a walk will become the new anchor habit.

The main habit needs to be grounded within us so strongly that we don’t allow ourselves to have second thoughts about it, which is what makes morning habits and early rising a challenge for many of us.

Here’s some great practical advice on early rising from fellow blogger Steve Pavlina: https://www.stevepavlina.com/blog/2005/05/how-to-become-an-early-riser/