The Mind Shifting Practice of Gratitude

Gratitude is a trick that goes a long way. It takes moving the emphasis from lack to abundance. The scarcity mindset is inherited from generations before, thus being part of our deep level of programming which makes us alert when we’re low on rice, money, attention – anything that we account for. So much so that we completely ignore the rest of 90% which we have in abundance.

We can break down our lives on different areas – health, wealth, relationships, self-growth and relationship with self, wellbeing etc. We have areas that are doing better than others. What gratitude does is shifting our view in all areas of life, including the ones where we feel that we are underperforming.

Thoughts like – ‘I hope I’ll get better’ change to ‘I’m grateful for health’. One health issue doesn’t mean that our entire health is lacking and by being grateful for abundance in health, we set our subconscious to put resources in place and facilitate healing.

I recently started keeping a journal where I write five things that I’m grateful for every day. It can be something small that happened or general aspects of life. This moves our focus to the generous aspects of life and makes the law of attraction work in our benefit.

Why Are Vision Boards Better than Family Photos?

Vision boards remind us about where we are going in life so we don’t get lost in opportunities, self-talk, peer pressure or whatever it is that life throws at us. Having a vision board makes daily choices easier. For instance in order to achieve great health and maintain it certain habits don’t align with the vision of life, while others – such as healthy eating, exercise, mindfulness and meditation – do.

What is a vision board?

A vision board reflects your goals and aspirations in all areas of life or specific areas, if you feel like you want to have a certain focus. The goals can be reflected in words or imagery: a photo of a crowd that tells you one day you’ll be there to share your ideas with them, a personality or an object – it can be anything that has meaning for you.

Simply put, a vision board is a tool that reminds you about your long-term goals and it’s a great trigger for visualizing yourself being that what you want. Also, there’s no reason why you can’t have some family photos there if that’s what drives you.

As our brain can’t perceive the different between immediate reality, memories and imagination, visualizing ourselves where we want to be sets the right attitude towards achieving it.

What areas can I cover in my vision board?

You can cover any or all of the following:

  • Finances
  • Career progression
  • Relationships
  • Love life
  • Health
  • Lifestyle
  • Charity

It won’t be Harry Potter magic – you won’t look at a number on the board, look in your pocket and find a check of the amount. But the cause – effect bond is strong and by knowing where you are going, your subconscious mind will help you make choices and explore ideas and opportunities that will take you one step closer to you goal.

And remember, as much as we take we get to offer back to the world. It can be through added value, inventiveness or financial contribution to the society – we do offer it back. Be intentional and add how you want to serve the world to the vision board.

Smartphone Dependency & Our Wellbeing Don’t Go Well Together

Even before having a Twitter account I engaged in debates over the effects that social media has on our behavior. Topics such as social isolation, bullying and harassment on one side and engagement, interaction, self-growth, networking on the other side were thrown around the table.

Did I ever wonder at that point about the role that technology plays and not just about the role of social media? Not at all.

A recent study led by researcher Matthew Lapierre from the University of Arizona looked at smartphone dependency and its connection to depression. The study revealed that it becomes problematic when people are using smartphones to replace or escape living their non-virtual existence.

Extreme reliance on our device, anxiety if we get separated from it for even a moment or two, are signs of later depression and loneliness. What can we do?

Exercise:

Live without your smartphone for 12 hours (sleeping doesn’t count).

  1. Let your loved ones know that you will be out of reach for 12 hours.
  2. Turn off the device or put it away, on silent.
  3. Live. Walk. Breath. Carry on with your day.
  4. Keep a journal of the experience.
  5. At the end of the 12 hours after feasting in the use of technology, read what you’ve wrote.
  6. How does that make you feel?

“If depression and loneliness lead to smartphone dependency, we could reduce dependency by adjusting people’s mental health, but if smartphone dependency (precedes depression and loneliness), which is what we found, we can reduce smartphone dependency to maintain or improve wellbeing.”

Communication Master’s Student Pengfei Zhao, Study Co-Authored

Resources:

Which comes first: Smartphone dependency or depression? by Matthew Lapierre. Pengfei Zhao and Benjamin Custer